Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Discussions of Through the Mists, Life Elysian and The Gate of Heaven
User avatar
Geoff
Site Admin
Posts: 872
Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 7:24 am
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
Contact:

Re: Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Postby Geoff » Fri Mar 09, 2012 10:52 pm

Mike Katz wrote:Hi Amanda
What stands out for me in chapter 1 is that Fred never lost his faith. He was not on good terms with the church, he was aware of how everyone, his father included, bought salvation, and yet his faith remained true.
I suppose in those days there was not much room for an atheistic point of view. Nevertheless, it would have been easily possible for Fred to live a kind of agnostic and completely secular life, without giving a moment's thought to spiritual values. On the contrary, Fred came to see that God is always there despite the church and its self-serving structures.

Mike


Hi Mike,

Good to see you here. Yes he had a sort of innate faith. Served him well it seems.

take care,
Geoff
Love commands the universe. Man only resorts to control when love is missing.

Amanda Stracey
New Friend
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 8:26 am

Re: Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Postby Amanda Stracey » Sat Mar 10, 2012 8:09 pm

I agree that it seems to me reading Aphraar's account of his earthly life that his early influences were the loss of his mother's love, the stern and strict father and a household with brother's and sisters in rebellion with the father.The part about the religious baby farm is a bit confusing but I assume he was sent away at some point to be raised outside the home at a religious children's home where he saw a lot of hypocrisy. Even so he still has the longing to work out as best he can a personal faith, I can't say from what he has written a personal relationship with God and how to be of practical service. He seems much more interested and motivated by down to earth practical help to the poor than preaching at them to change their lives.

Here is a little article that sheds some more light on Victorian life for the poor and the attitude of the rich towards the poor.

http://www.hiddenlives.org.uk/articles/poverty.html

Once he passes over, a pretty rapid but pain free process, he doesn't seem afraid of the change but rather fascinated by where he is and what's happening. I get the sense that the colours are brighter, more brilliant and somehow more real than on earth. There seems to a sense of calm organisation and preparation - everything is anticipated and in readiness. There's an absence of panic, fear and worry

I've tried not to read too far ahead but I'm assuming there will be some explanation of the purpose of The Mists but I feel some hint of a cleansing function. Does anyone grasp or have a theory as to why the boy fell asleep but Aphraar does not?

The person he meets who takes the boy away reassures him by saying “You are in a land of surprises, but you need not fear, it will bring for you nothing but rest
and compensation.” Sounds like this is very comforting and designed to put him at his ease without giving away too much.

User avatar
Geoff
Site Admin
Posts: 872
Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 7:24 am
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
Contact:

Re: Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Postby Geoff » Sat Mar 10, 2012 11:39 pm

Amanda Stracey wrote:Does anyone grasp or have a theory as to why the boy fell asleep but Aphraar does not?


Dear Amanda,

Both will have been "unconscious" for some period, but Aphraar awakes a fraction earlier. This is what we were talking about in earlier posts, because in this explanation from Judas, he was conscious the very instant his spirit/soul separated from the body: http://new-birth.net/contemporary/hr20.htm and thus found himself in the earth plane. There are other similar tales in "30 Years amongst the dead". The Earth plane is right here, just time-separarated, and thus the two dimensions intermingle. The First Spirit Sphere is a small distance away, and you have to travel to get there.

I have already "asked" that if it is feasible, I would like to be similarly conscious the very instant after physical death. A similar story is told by Nina of her death: http://new-birth.net/tgrabjvol3/minor296.htm

The Urantia Book has a complex explanation about what has to happen, and how it happens, and claims it takes 3 days. But the 3 days seems to be not to be borne out in some examples one can find. Whether the rest is correct I don't know.

Amanda Stracey wrote:Sounds like this is very comforting and designed to put him at his ease without giving away too much.

Indeed that is the purpose of the "slopes" and numerous other "devices" such as hospitals used for the initial introduction, and all helpers do all they can to put you at ease. The exceptions to this process are those who are very evil. They get no help at all. Or very little.

There is a whole (although small) book written just on this initial process and arrival, called "The Blue Island". Its those on the Titanic, and curiously a very large number of them were conscious and in the Earth Plane (around the ship) after their death, and then "ascended" as it was described, to finally arrive at the "Blue Island" which seems to be a variation of the "slopes". Here is a pdf of the Blue Island: http://new-birth.net/booklet/BlueIsland.pdf you can find a synopsis on this page: http://new-birth.net/books_life_after_death.htm My interpretation is that these were the folks who were not spiritual enough to see the guides who were there trying to transition these folks. Others would have had a different experience.

The point of all this is not to get too fixated on what happened to a particular person, which is what we tend to do of course. We are trying to arrive at what will happen to ourselves.

love,
Geoff
Love commands the universe. Man only resorts to control when love is missing.

Joseph B
New Friend
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:03 pm

Re: Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Postby Joseph B » Sun Mar 11, 2012 2:15 am

From my perspective, the key to the appreciation of Lees’ first book is found in Fred’s statement found on page 2, second paragraph from the bottom. We read:

I had companionship and sweet communion in my worship, after this manner: Led by some influence, to me nothing less than an inspiration, I would find myself in one of the courts and alleys so numerous in the East of London, where vice, poverty, and wretchedness most abound; where help, though urgently needed, is seldom met with; where the inhabitants are not learned in metaphysics, but hunger for the bread of practical sympathy.

How did Frederick (later Aphraar) make such an enormous leap from being a child of a stern and financially successful Calvinist to this person of compassion and practical sympathy for the poor and outcast of London East? Having no mother, why did he not simply follow the footsteps and example of his father?

By his own admission he was a loner, his only companions were books, poets in particular, and the Bible also. When the time came, without hesitancy and thought of danger, he acted in behalf of a lad in distress. Reading books alone will not give a man such compassion, and reading the Bible will not build such character.

Was it perhaps Frederick’s openness to the influence and guidance of benevolent spirits? Is this the influence he alludes to in the above quote?

I responded positively when I first read this book; and I am now reading it for the third time and chapter one continues to inspire me. It is the heart (soul) of a man that matters, not the formalism of so-called accepted religious thinking. The gentle and helpful spirit that came to fetch the sleeping lad in Frederick’s arms tells a parable, and after says this:

So children of a larger growth, upon entering this life, find that even so have they been lulled to spiritual slumber by the fictions of the nurses of their souls (second paragraph from the bottom, page 7, chapter I).

“Lulled to spiritual slumber by the fictions of the nurses of souls;” who are these today? Who are they today that would keep us in a state of sleep? The answer is certainly not only the preachers, priests, vicars and popes and other religious leaders. Who else? And how can we help ourselves to be awake?

User avatar
LiminaL969
New Friend
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 2:51 am

Re: Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Postby LiminaL969 » Sun Mar 11, 2012 3:45 am

Rather telling that this type of "worship" is not generally practiced, emphasized or advised by the AJMDLP community. If fact, quite the opposite it is the poor soul condition and law of attraction of the impoverished that one would be doing them a disservice by offering "sympathy". What Fred is talking about is the same compassion demonstrated by the Historical Jesus. This level of sympathetic imagination and empathy: com-passion - feeling along with is what can raise one's awareness of God with us.

- Dean

User avatar
Geoff
Site Admin
Posts: 872
Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 7:24 am
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
Contact:

Re: Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Postby Geoff » Sun Mar 11, 2012 8:57 am

Just followed that link to the Victoria era, to find this picture of street kids. It truly saves 1000 words

Image

It is said that there were 30,000 of them in London in 1848.

Image

Didnt actually know they had a camera device at that time, I will look that up. Yeah they did, by 1839

love,
Geoff
Love commands the universe. Man only resorts to control when love is missing.

Joseph B
New Friend
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:03 pm

Re: Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Postby Joseph B » Sun Mar 11, 2012 2:40 pm

Dear Geoff,

Thanks for posting the photos of the kids on the street in London. This is very similar to what Fred (Aphraar) saw and responded positively to.

Not to 'spoil' the story for those who have not yet read the entire book, but only to say that many wonderful spirits loved and cared deeply for these children, and attended to them, and knew each by name. Reminds me of a message of Jesus received by Padgett that no person is insignificant. How true.

With love,

Joseph

Amanda Stracey
New Friend
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 8:26 am

Re: Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Postby Amanda Stracey » Mon Mar 19, 2012 10:01 am

If anyone wishes to follow the online book discussion as well the first presentation is on youtube now.

http://www.youtube.com/user/WizardShak/featured

Here is a link to Mary's blog where the questions and timetable are laid out.

http://magdalena-mary.blogspot.co.uk/

There appears to have been a wonderful response to her desire to look at this book judging by all the people there and all the work everyone has put into their "homework".

Amanda Stracey
New Friend
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 8:26 am

Re: Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Postby Amanda Stracey » Tue Mar 20, 2012 9:55 am

I've listened to the youtube book group and the discussion about Dives and Lazarus interested me and I felt the desire to explore the Parable further. I'm copying it here for ease of reference

Luke 16:19-31

New International Version (NIV)
The Rich Man and Lazarus
19 “There was a rich man who was dressed in purple and fine linen and lived in luxury every day. 20 At his gate was laid a beggar named Lazarus, covered with sores 21 and longing to eat what fell from the rich man’s table. Even the dogs came and licked his sores.

22 “The time came when the beggar died and the angels carried him to Abraham’s side. The rich man also died and was buried. 23 In Hades, where he was in torment, he looked up and saw Abraham far away, with Lazarus by his side. 24 So he called to him, ‘Father Abraham, have pity on me and send Lazarus to dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue, because I am in agony in this fire.’

25 “But Abraham replied, ‘Son, remember that in your lifetime you received your good things, while Lazarus received bad things, but now he is comforted here and you are in agony. 26 And besides all this, between us and you a great chasm has been set in place, so that those who want to go from here to you cannot, nor can anyone cross over from there to us.’

27 “He answered, ‘Then I beg you, father, send Lazarus to my family, 28 for I have five brothers. Let him warn them, so that they will not also come to this place of torment.’

29 “Abraham replied, ‘They have Moses and the Prophets; let them listen to them.’

30 “‘No, father Abraham,’ he said, ‘but if someone from the dead goes to them, they will repent.’

31 “He said to him, ‘If they do not listen to Moses and the Prophets, they will not be convinced even if someone rises from the dead."

Mary has asked the question about the corruption of Wealth. Does poverty equal goodness and does wealth equal evil or sin?

This is what I would call a straight Christian answer to that question "This parable could also be called the Parable of Reversal. It teaches that the first will be last and the last will be first. It teaches that God’s priorities are different from the priorities of this world. It teaches that the treasure of heaven is evidenced in this life in the form of being a servant, of showing love, of acting as the hands and feet of God."

I'm going to leave the questions hanging in mid-air for the moment.

User avatar
Geoff
Site Admin
Posts: 872
Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 7:24 am
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
Contact:

Re: Through the Mists - R J Lees Chapter 1

Postby Geoff » Tue Mar 20, 2012 9:47 pm

Amanda Stracey wrote:Mary has asked the question about the corruption of Wealth. Does poverty equal goodness and does wealth equal evil or sin?


Of course it does not. But poverty generally, and typically causes people to share and be generous. They look out for each other. They have so little, and learn that its best to share. Curiously wealth often, but not always leads to selfishness and greed. You would "logically" expect the reverse?

Amanda Stracey wrote: It teaches that the first will be last and the last will be first. It teaches that God’s priorities are different from the priorities of this world. It teaches that the treasure of heaven is evidenced in this life in the form of being a servant, of showing love, of acting as the hands and feet of God."


Well it is certainly the case that service to others is the path home.

I might add one other aspect of this parable that orthodox Christians have never noticed. The Rich man is in hell, and is talking in the now. So he is now in hell, yet there has been no day of judgement. This parable has the hidden message that we are judged everyday, and a "day of judgement" or the "final day" is not the day that the tares and wheat are separated in that some go to hell. Of course we who follow the Padgett Messages do speculate that the "Final Judgement" is the closing of the heavens.

However I very much doubt that paragraph 26 is as the parable was delivered, because we do know that the more advanced spirits can go to the hells. But the reverse is true, those in the hells cannot escape except it seems to the Earth Plane. There is a stunningly good book which describes the hells so well. Its as good as a novel actually: Gone West: Three Narratives of After Death Experiences by J.S.M.Ward on this page http://new-birth.net/books_life_after_death.htm

love,
Geoff
Love commands the universe. Man only resorts to control when love is missing.


Return to “Lees books”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest